How to use your OPT to your advantage?

This is what I came across three years ago when I was looking for a summer job:
After an interview, the HR told me,
"Your resume is very impressive, but we don't sponsor International students..Sorry."
A year later, I met this HR in another event.
"Oh, you still don't have a green card yet? Sorry, our company policy still haven't changed yet."

I really wanted to say this to this HR person ---It's all right, it is your LOSS.
Though I wanted to say it, I didn't because it's not a good idea to burn bridges in this actuarial community.

So how to you use your international student status to your advantage?
I called it the "Test Drive" technique:

"Yes, I can certainly understand your concern. But do you know that I can work in the states for one year, using my optional practical training(OPT), without the company paying for the working visa application fees?

Hence, I can work for your company for a year without the working visa. After a year, if you like my working performance, you can then initiate the working visa application process. I would see this year as a risk-free "test-driving" period of my ability.

Win-win situation. If you want to know anything more about the OPT, I can have the director of the international center of my school to contact you tomorrow. "

"All I ask is a chance to prove myself and I believe I'm the best candidate for this position."

Then you close the deal by--(an indrect close)

"What do you think? "

Thank you to Gretchen and Tom for providing the advice on the Netoworking Workshop yesterday!

Further Reference:
Six Ways to Close the Deal
Optional Practical Training





P.S. These are only my two cents. Please also seek for professional advice from your school International Center.

2 comments:

Beibei said...

hey, yukki..how are you?

so long never talk to u, even online.. looking for jobs already? how time flies. all the best!
cheerz~

James said...

I really wanted to say this to this HR person ---It's all right, it is your LOSS.

In your case, I would agree. I know I would hire you, regardless of whether you were a US national.

However, it's hard to escape a feeling of rejection when someone turns you down. I think as actuaries, we have to confidence in our own ability to face challenges and to say, "it IS your loss" when turned down for a position. (But don't forget to write those thank-you notes for being interviewed!)